drag sth down

drag sth down
UK US drag sth down
Phrasal Verb with drag({{}}/dræg/ verb (-gg-)
to make something decrease or get worse: »

He said that any deal on emissions must not drag down growth.

»

The company said earnings have been dragged down by high start-up costs.


Financial and business terms. 2012.

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Look at other dictionaries:

  • drag something down — ˌdrag sb/sthˈdown (to sth) derived to bring sb/sth to a lower social or economic level, a lower standard of behaviour, etc • If he fails, he ll drag us all down with him. Main entry: ↑dragderived …   Useful english dictionary

  • drag somebody down to something — ˌdrag sb/sthˈdown (to sth) derived to bring sb/sth to a lower social or economic level, a lower standard of behaviour, etc • If he fails, he ll drag us all down with him. Main entry: ↑dragderived …   Useful english dictionary

  • drag something down to something — ˌdrag sb/sthˈdown (to sth) derived to bring sb/sth to a lower social or economic level, a lower standard of behaviour, etc • If he fails, he ll drag us all down with him. Main entry: ↑dragderived …   Useful english dictionary

  • drag — [dræg] verb [transitive] COMPUTING to move words, pictures etc across a computer screen by pulling them along with the mouse: • Either drag and drop the page into a message or choose Send Page from under the File menu. * * * Ⅰ. drag UK US /dræg/… …   Financial and business terms

  • drag — drag1 W3S3 [dræg] v past tense and past participle dragged present participle dragging ▬▬▬▬▬▬▬ 1¦(pull something)¦ 2¦(pull somebody)¦ 3 drag yourself to/into/out of etc something 4¦(persuade somebody to come)¦ 5¦(computer)¦ 6¦(be boring)¦… …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • drag — 1 verb dragged, dragging 1 PULL ALONG THE GROUND (T) to pull someone or something along the ground, often because they are too heavy to carry: drag sth away/along/through etc: Inge managed to drag the table into the kitchen. | Angry protesters… …   Longman dictionary of contemporary English

  • drag*/ — [dræg] verb I 1) [T] to pull something along with difficulty, especially something heavy She dragged her suitcase down the path.[/ex] 2) [T] to pull someone strongly or violently when they do not want to go with you I grabbed his arm and dragged… …   Dictionary for writing and speaking English

  • hump — hump1 [hʌmp] n [Date: 1600 1700; Origin: Perhaps from Dutch homp or Low German humpe] 1.) a large round shape that rises above the surface of something ▪ the hump of a hill 2.) speed/traffic humps BrE a series of humps in the road, designed to… …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • foot — foot1 W1S1 [fut] n plural feet [fi:t] ▬▬▬▬▬▬▬ 1¦(body part)¦ 2¦(measurement)¦ 3¦(bottom part)¦ 4 on foot 5 get/jump/rise etc to your feet 6 be on your feet 7 be/get back on your feet …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • drop — The difference between the prices in a dollar roll on the two settlement dates. The drop is expressed in 32nds. The drop is the price that the buyer of the dollar roll pays to the seller for the right to own the mortgage security and receive its… …   Financial and business terms

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